Coffee Lesson #26

briki:

  • a briki is a small long-handled pot used to make coffee
    • coffee made with this pot, and in this style, is most common in Armenia, Greece, Turkey/Türkiye, and throughout Eastern Europe and the Balkans (these two regions have some overlap–)
    • coffee made with this pot, and in this style, is often referred to as Greek or Turkish coffee
  • a briki is a small long-handled pot used to make coffee
    • the pot is traditionally made of brass or copper; however, nowadays, it is routinely made from stainless steel, aluminium, or ceramics
  • briki – Greek; cezve – Turkish — term referenced in two previous coffee lessons (#25 and #24)
Photo by Ricardo Díaz on Unsplash

Coffee Lesson #25

Greek Coffee:

  • similar to, at times argued to be the same as, Turkish Coffee
    • a particular way to brew, serve, prepare coffee . . .
      • coffee is prepared in a briki, using very finely ground coffee beans without filtering
        • briki: a small pot with a long handle, traditionally made of copper or brass
    • coffee brewed with very finely ground coffee beans
      • when served, do not drink the entirety of the serving–in this preparation coffee grounds are not removed from the coffee when served
    • coffee preparation style that can be found throughout the world, though it has particular prominence in Turkey/Türkiye, Greece, Armenia, Eastern Europe, and the Balkans

Greek v. Turkish Coffee: similar to one another, argued to be exactly the same . . . however:

  • Greek coffee tends to be lighter roast
  • Both can be sweetened, but generally Turkish coffee will add sugar directly into the cevze (“briki” in Greek), while Greeks add sugar afterward . . .

  • In my experience Greek coffee was larger–had more that I could actually drink. When I ordered Greek coffee I was always asked if I wanted sugar, and then how much or what kind (sketos/black; metrios/semi-sweet); glykos/sweet). When I ordered and received my Greek coffee, it was generally served alone, sometimes an unsweetened cookie might be served with it, it was just the coffee; whereas, in Turkey, Turkish coffee was almost always served with something sweet (Turkish delight).
MS Rooftop Garden–Attica, Athens, Greece

Attica, Athens, Greece

Between November 2021 – April 2022 I visited Athens, Greece 🇬🇷 three times, for a total of 62 days.

I went in November, sort of on a whim, begrudgingly, a sort of layover between jobs. It wasn’t my first choice to travel just then, and it wasn’t my first choice to go to Greece either. In fact, I had never really had any desire to travel to Greece . . . but I went . . . and I absolutely LOVED it!

The job fell through, and so did a couple of other applications, but I had a seasonal remote contract with something else, so I kept returning to see more, enjoy more, do more. I fell in love with everything — the language, the people, the museums, the sites, the greenery, the coffee!

I have to go back, and see more of Athens, and venture beyond it as there’s a whole lot more to the country to see, but before I do, before I recommend some coffee and share about this amazing adventure, allow me to share some pictures 🤗.

Here’s a preview, a taste, a sneak peak into Greece, and some Greek coffee ☕

November 2021:

December 2021-January 2022

March 2022-April 2022

Coffee Gallery

Okay–it’s a dessert (butterscotch cheesecake & fruit tart) and coffee gallery 😉

Theta Restaurant; Attica, Athens, Greece–dessert & Greek Coffee

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